Carlos S. Moreno, PhD

Titles and Roles

Associate Professor, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Emory University School of Medicine
Associate Professor, Department of Biomedical Informatics
Emory University School of Medicine
Research Program
Cancer Genetics and Epigenetics

Biography

Carlos S. Moreno, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, and Biomedical Informatics at the Emory University School of Medicine. He is a member of the Cancer Genetics and Epigenetics research program at Winship Cancer Institute.

Dr. Moreno specializes in cancer bioinformatics and systems biology, analysis of genome-wide expression profiles, transcriptional networks, ChIP-chip studies, biological pathway analysis, and computational analysis of transcription factor binding sites. Dr. Moreno is  project leader for informatics for the Emory Molecular Interaction Center for Functional genomics (MicFG) as part of the Cancer Target Discovery and Development (CTD²) Network to analyze TCGA data for protein-protein interaction networks.

Education

Dr. Moreno earned his BS and MS from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA. He received his PhD from Emory University in Atlanta, GA.

Research

Dr. Moreno's main research interests are in translational cancer bioinformatics and systems biology, to identify diagnostic markers for more effective and personalized therapies, to identify new potential therapeutic targets, and to better understand the biology of tumor progression. His research has focused on the dissection of the perturbed transcriptional networks in prostate, brain, breast, and ovarian cancers using DNA microarrays and next generation sequencing. His lab has identified several genes that are strongly correlated with prostate cancer progression, including two developmental transcription factors, HOXC6 and SOX4. His lab is also developing mRNA and microRNA biomarkers of recurrence in prostate cancer. His lab analyzes genome-wide expression profiles, transcriptional networks, ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq studies, biological pathways, and evolutionarily conserved transcription factor binding sites to dissect cancer-related transcriptional networks and identify new drug targets and biomarkers. They are heavily involved in analysis of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas project to identify potential drug targets as part of the Cancer Target Discovery and Development (CTD²) Network at NCI.

Publications

Additional Websites

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